Dr. Chris Milkie Explains Severe Foot Pain May Benefit Greatly From Surgery

When wearing ill-fitting shoes and in combination with long hours of walking and standing, the inevitable result is pain in the foot and the strong possibility of a pin. Calluses on the feet and toes every time they are forced against the solid walls of shoes, and when these calluses grow inward and press against the bones of the feet and nerve endings, pain and discomfort can result. Fortunately, corns are quite easy to handle, and the total elimination of calluses on the feet can be achieved in several ways. Use 6 drops in a spray bottle mixed with distilled water to use in the bathroom as an air freshener.

When using the scrub, which should be done three times a week in the morning and before you go to sleep, fill enough water in a basin to cover your feet, add 1 cup of apple-cider vinegar, and soak your feet for 10 to 15 minutes. The vinegar helps to soften hard skin. After the soak, use firm pressure to massage the Callus Smoother Scrub into your feet. Do this for approximately 2 to 3 minutes on each foot, but you can use the scrub for as long as you want. Then rinse your feet with warm water and rub them dry with a coarse towel.

Some of the most common of these foot conditions are calluses, bunions, and corns. While many people assume that changing shoes will diminish the development of these common foot ailments, different shoes alone may not necessarily do the trick when you have a long second toe. Not matter what type of shoes you wear, if your foot endures abnormal pronation you may develop corns, bunions, or calluses to compensate for the stress on the foot. (The most common location for calluses is under the second metatarsal bone, where much stress is placed in the case of Morton’s Toe.

You can tell you have a corn or callus by its appearance. A callus is hard, dry, and thick, and it may appear grayish or yellowish. It may be less sensitive to the touch than surrounding skin, and it may feel bumpy. A hard corn is also firm and thick. It may have a soft yellow ring with a gray center. A soft corn looks like an open sore. A hammer toe is a toe that bends down toward the floor at the middle toe joint. It usually happens in the second toe. This causes the middle toe joint to rise up. Hammer toes often occur with bunions

If you have bunions-an abnormality of joint near your big toe that causes the joint to enlarge-you already know there are many ways to treat this foot condition (Mayo Clinic, see Resources). If conservative treatments such as pain relievers, new shoes and shoe inserts are not helping you return to your normal activities, you may need to consider having surgery to correct the problem. As with any other kind of invasive treatment, bunion surgery is a serious matter, requiring preparation on your part before the big day. Hammer toes is when your toe curls downward into a claw-like position, and may need to be taped to straighten and realign.bunion callus

If you are considering bunion surgery, before surgery ask your surgeon about orthotics after surgery. If they do not understand the benefits of orthotics post-surgery, then you may want to consider a different surgeon. If you have already had bunion surgery and have pain under the ball of the foot, then see a podiatrist who specializes in orthotic therapy. In the Seattle area you can make an appointment for an evaluation in our office If you don’t have access to an orthotic expert, try these home treatment hints. If you follow these simple at-home foot remedies, you will soon be able to take your feet in public once again.

A bunion, known as hallux abductovalgus in medical terminology, is a bump at the inner side of the foot at the big toe joint. Hammertoes are contractures of the smaller toes, and the condition is often associated with a corn or callous. Bunions and hammertoes are progressive throughout life. They can be present from early teen years through to any age. They are hereditary and are most often caused by an inherited faulty biomechanical structure of the foot. Factors such as weight, activity level and shoe choices can also affect the development of these deformities.

Bunions are painful lumps at the side of the big toe joint that don’t go away by normal means. These lumps prevent a regular shoe from fitting properly over the affected foot and stop the sufferer from leading a normal active life due to the swelling, pain and footwear problems involved. Surgery doesn’t always help and sometimes compounds the problem, leading to more surgery to undo the first. However, some relief may be achieved by various natural methods which are set out here. Most foot problems are due to inflammation. Using anti-inflammatory such as ibuprofen found in Motrin and Advil, or naproxen found in Aleve will help ease the pain.

Certain exercises such as stretching and moving your toe gently with your hands and picking soft or small objects such as towels or marbles can keep the joints in your toes flexible. Moreover, while reading or watching television, you can also place a towel flat udder your feet and use your toes to crumple it. This rudimentary exercise can strengthen and stretch your toe muscles. You should always consult with your podiatrist first before treating a foot problem on your own. And if you have diabetes or poor circulation in your feet, never try to treat corns or calluses yourself. Instead always visit a podiatrist for professional care.

I want you to enjoy the holidays as much as possible without foot woes. The best way to do this is to make sure that any footwear you may buy really does fit your feet properly as nothing dampens a festive mood as a screaming pair of painful feet! Try a few of the suggestions here in order to prevent pain or discomfort from blisters and bunions before they begin. Especially if your foot is sweating and the shoe rubs against the back of your heel, tops/sides of your toes, as can happen when dancing, you’re almost certain to get a blister.bunion callus